ISCATECH   Bedoukian   RussellIPM   Piezoelectric Micro-Sprayer


Home
Animal Taxa
Plant Taxa
Semiochemicals
Floral Compounds
Semiochemical Detail
Semiochemicals & Taxa
Synthesis
Control
Invasive spp.
References

Abstract

Guide

Chemtica
Biochemtech
AlphaScents
U-Chemo
BIOHOME
Print
Email to a Friend
Kindly Donate for The Pherobase

« Previous AbstractLinkage between smoking and asthma    Next AbstractLattice corneal dystrophy, gelsolin type (Meretoja's syndrome) »

Anaesthesia


Title:The effect of intrathecal fentanyl on Cerebral State Index-guided sedation during spinal anaesthesia
Author(s):Kim, J. Y. Kim, K. B. Shin, C. S. Ha, S. H. Kim, M. K. Lee, J. S.
Address:Department of Anaesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Anaesthesia and Pain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Year:2009 Dec
Journal Title:Anaesthesia
Page Number:1307-11
Language:eng
Volume:64
Issue:12
ISSN/ISBN:1365-2044 (Electronic). 0003-2409 (Linking)
Abstract:This study investigated the effect of intrathecal fentanyl on the dose of propofol during sedation guided by Cerebral State Index monitoring. Seventy patients were randomly assigned to receive either fentanyl 25 microg (n = 35) or normal saline (n = 35) with hyperbaric bupivacaine 12.5 mg for spinal anaesthesia. Propofol was infused to maintain a Cerebral State Index value of 65-75 for 30 min. The propofol infusion time and dose required to reach a Cerebral State Index value of 75 were recorded together with the time required to reach a Cerebral State Index value higher than 90 after cessation of sedation. The onset time for sedation was faster and the recovery time was slower in the fentanyl group compared to those in the saline group (p = 0.018 and 0.027, respectively). The propofol doses required for onset and maintenance of sedation were significantly lower in the fentanyl group compared to those in the control group (p = 0.018 and < 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, adding intrathecal fentanyl 25 microg during spinal anaesthesia significantly reduced the dose of propofol required for sedation and prolonged the subsequent recovery time.

 
Back to top
 
Citation: El-Sayed AM 2021. The Pherobase: Database of Pheromones and Semiochemicals. <http://www.pherobase.com>.
© 2003-2021 The Pherobase - Extensive Database of Pheromones and Semiochemicals. Ashraf M. El-Sayed.
Page created on 24-01-2021